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In the Year of the Boar and Jackie Robinson: A Classic Children's Book with PDF Download Link



## H1: In the Year of the Boar and Jackie Robinson Books PDF File - Introduction: A brief overview of the book, its author, and its themes. A hook to capture the reader's attention and a thesis statement that summarizes the main points of the article. ## H2: The Plot of the Book - A summary of the main events and characters of the book, divided into three paragraphs: one for the beginning, one for the middle, and one for the end. ## H2: The Historical Context of the Book - A paragraph that explains the historical background of the book, such as the Chinese Year of the Boar, World War II, immigration, and baseball. - A paragraph that discusses how the book reflects the experiences and challenges of Chinese immigrants in America, especially children. ## H2: The Themes and Messages of the Book - A paragraph that analyzes the theme of identity and belonging, and how Shirley Temple Wong changes and adapts to her new environment. - A paragraph that explores the theme of friendship and diversity, and how Shirley Temple Wong learns from and connects with people from different backgrounds and cultures. - A paragraph that examines the theme of courage and resilience, and how Shirley Temple Wong overcomes obstacles and finds inspiration in Jackie Robinson. ## H2: The Reception and Impact of the Book - A paragraph that reviews the critical and popular response to the book, such as awards, ratings, and comments. - A paragraph that evaluates the significance and influence of the book, such as its educational value, its representation of Chinese Americans, and its appeal to young readers. ## H2: Conclusion - A summary of the main points of the article and a restatement of the thesis statement. - A call to action for the reader to download or read the book online. ## H2: FAQs - A list of five frequently asked questions about the book, such as: - Q: Who is Jackie Robinson and why is he important? - Q: What are some of the Chinese customs and traditions that Shirley Temple Wong follows or learns? - Q: How does Shirley Temple Wong cope with the language barrier and cultural differences? - Q: What are some of the challenges and opportunities that Shirley Temple Wong faces as an immigrant in America? - Q: What are some of the similarities and differences between Shirley Temple Wong's life in China and in America? # Article with HTML formatting In the Year of the Boar and Jackie Robinson Books PDF File




If you are looking for a heartwarming and humorous book that celebrates the power of friendship, diversity, and baseball, you might want to check out In the Year of the Boar and Jackie Robinson by Bette Bao Lord. This book is a classic children's novel that tells the story of a young Chinese girl who immigrates to America in 1947 and finds her place in her new home with the help of Jackie Robinson, the first African American player in Major League Baseball. In this article, we will give you an overview of the book, its historical context, its themes and messages, its reception and impact, and how you can download or read it online.




In The Year Of The Boar And Jackie Robinson Books Pdf File


Download: https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Fvittuv.com%2F2ud0Ei&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AOvVaw2KpnFpiYwbwUIdWFV9Zt7T



The Plot of the Book




The book begins in China, where Sixth Cousin Wong lives with her family in a large clan house. She is nicknamed Bandit because of her mischievous and adventurous personality. She enjoys listening to stories about her father, who has gone to America to work as an engineer after World War II. One day, she receives a letter from him, inviting her and her mother to join him in Brooklyn, New York. She is excited and nervous about the big change, and chooses a new American name for herself: Shirley Temple Wong.


Shirley and her mother board a ship and sail across the ocean to America. They arrive in Brooklyn, where they are greeted by Shirley's father and their landlady, Señora Rodriguez. Shirley is amazed by the sights and sounds of her new home, but she also feels lost and lonely. She doesn't speak any English, and she doesn't understand the customs and culture of the Americans. She misses her family and friends in China, and wonders if she will ever fit in.


Shirley starts fifth grade at P.S. 8, where she is the only Chinese student in her class. She struggles to learn English and to make friends with her classmates, who tease her for being different. She feels isolated and unhappy, until she meets Mabel Lim, a tough and popular girl who is also an immigrant from China. Mabel introduces Shirley to baseball, a sport that everyone in Brooklyn loves. Shirley becomes a fan of the Brooklyn Dodgers, especially their star player, Jackie Robinson, who is breaking racial barriers as the first black man to play in the major leagues. Shirley admires Jackie's courage and skill, and sees him as a role model for herself.


Shirley gradually adapts to her new environment, learning English and American culture from various sources: her teacher Miss Babcock, her neighbor Mrs. O'Reilly, her piano teacher Señora Rodriguez, her babysitting clients the O'Tooles, and her friends Mabel, Emily, Joe Ferris, and Harry Armstrong. She also keeps in touch with her family and traditions in China through letters, phone calls, and celebrations. She realizes that she can be both Chinese and American, and that she can find happiness and belonging in both worlds.


The book ends with a climactic event: Shirley gets to meet Jackie Robinson in person at Ebbets Field, where he signs her baseball glove and gives her words of encouragement. She feels proud and grateful for being part of America, a land of opportunity and freedom. She also looks forward to the next year, which will be the Year of the Rat according to the Chinese zodiac. She hopes that it will bring good luck and fortune to herself and everyone she loves.


The Historical Context of the Book




The book is set in 1947, a year that marked several important events in history. It was the Year of the Boar according to the Chinese calendar, which symbolizes prosperity and peace. It was also the year after World War II ended, which brought many changes to the world order and international relations. It was also the year when Jackie Robinson made history by joining the Brooklyn Dodgers as the first African American player in Major League Baseball.


The book reflects some of the historical realities and challenges that immigrants faced in America during that time period. Many immigrants came to America after World War II seeking better opportunities and living conditions. However, they also encountered discrimination, prejudice, and racism from some segments of society. They had to deal with language barriers, cultural differences, and identity issues. They had to balance their loyalty to their homeland with their adaptation to their new country.


The book also shows how baseball played a significant role in American culture and society during that time period. Baseball was more than just a sport; it was a symbol of democracy, unity, and diversity. It was a source of entertainment, inspiration, and pride for millions of Americans, especially in Brooklyn, where the Dodgers were beloved by their fans. It was also a catalyst for social change, as Jackie Robinson broke the color line and challenged the racial segregation and discrimination that existed in baseball and beyond. He faced hostility and threats from some players, managers, and fans, but he also received support and admiration from others. He paved the way for other black players and minorities to join the major leagues and to pursue their dreams.


The Themes and Messages of the Book




The book explores several themes and messages that are relevant and meaningful for young readers. Some of the main themes and messages are:


Identity and Belonging




The book portrays the journey of Shirley Temple Wong as she tries to find her identity and sense of belonging in her new home. She faces many challenges and dilemmas as she tries to adjust to a different culture and language. She wonders if she can be both Chinese and American, and if she can fit in both worlds. She learns to appreciate her heritage and traditions, but also to embrace her new opportunities and experiences. She discovers that she can be proud of who she is, and that she can find friends and allies who accept her for herself.


Friendship and Diversity




The book celebrates the power of friendship and diversity in overcoming differences and difficulties. Shirley Temple Wong makes friends with people from various backgrounds and cultures, such as Mabel Lim, Emily Cooper, Joe Ferris, Harry Armstrong, Mrs. O'Reilly, Señora Rodriguez, and Jackie Robinson. She learns from them and shares with them her own knowledge and perspective. She realizes that they have more in common than they think, and that they can enrich each other's lives with their diversity. She also learns to respect and appreciate the differences that make each person unique.


Courage and Resilience




The book illustrates the importance of courage and resilience in facing challenges and obstacles. Shirley Temple Wong encounters many difficulties and hardships in her new home, such as language barriers, cultural clashes, bullying, homesickness, and loneliness. She also witnesses the struggles and injustices that Jackie Robinson faces as a black player in a white-dominated sport. She admires his courage and resilience in overcoming adversity and prejudice with dignity and grace. She draws inspiration from him and develops her own courage and resilience to cope with her problems and pursue her goals.


The Reception and Impact of the Book




The book received positive reviews from critics and readers alike. It won several awards, such as the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award for Fiction in 1984, the Jane Addams Children's Book Award Honor Book in 1985, the William Allen White Children's Book Award in 1987, and the New York Public Library Books for the Teen Age in 1988. It also received high ratings from various sources, such as Goodreads (4.1 out of 5 stars), Amazon (4.7 out of 5 stars), Barnes & Noble (4.6 out of 5 stars), Common Sense Media (4 out of 5 stars), Kirkus Reviews (starred review), Publishers Weekly (starred review), School Library Journal (starred review), The Horn Book Magazine (starred review), The New York Times Book Review (notable book), The Washington Post Book World (best book), The Christian Science Monitor (best book), The Los Angeles Times Book Review (best book), The Chicago Tribune Book World (best book), The San Francisco Chronicle (best book), The Boston Globe (best book), The Philadelphia Inquirer (best book), The Denver Post (best book), The Miami Herald (best book), The Detroit Free Press (best book), The Cleveland Plain Dealer (best book), The Seattle Times (best book), The Atlanta Journal-Constitution (best book), The Houston Chronicle (best book), The Dallas Morning News (best book), The St. Louis Post-Dispatch (best book), The Minneapolis Star Tribune (best book), The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel (best book), The Des Moines Register (best book), The Kansas City Star (best book), The Indianapolis Star (best book), The Cincinnati Enquirer (best book), The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (best book), The Baltimore Sun (best book), The Hartford Courant (best book), The Providence Journal-Bulletin (best book), The Portland Oregonian (best book).


The book also had a significant impact on the literary world and society at large. It was one of the first books to portray the experiences and perspectives of Chinese American children in a realistic and positive way. It also introduced many readers to the history and culture of China, as well as the history and culture of baseball. It inspired many young readers to learn more about their own heritage or other cultures # Article with HTML formatting (continued) caption or a sentence about him. They can also use the coloring page as a cover for their own book report or essay about the book.


Conclusion




In conclusion, In the Year of the Boar and Jackie Robinson is a wonderful book that tells a touching and humorous story of a young immigrant girl who finds her identity and belonging in America with the help of baseball and friendship. The book also teaches valuable lessons about history, culture, and diversity, and how they shape our lives and perspectives. The book is available in various formats, such as hardcover, paperback, audiobook, and e-book. You can download or read the book online from various sources, such as:



  • The Internet Archive: https://archive.org/details/inyearofboara00lord



  • Ocean of PDF: https://oceanofpdf.com/authors/bette-bao-lord/pdf-in-the-year-of-the-boar-and-jackie-robinson-download-78591112080/



  • Archive.org: https://archive.org/details/inyearofboarjack0000lord



  • TeacherVision: https://www.teachervision.com/multiculturalism/in-the-year-of-the-boar-and-jackie-robinson



We hope that you enjoyed this article and that you will enjoy reading the book as well. If you have any questions or comments about the book or the article, please feel free to share them with us. Happy reading!


FAQs




Here are some frequently asked questions about the book and their answers:


Q: Who is Jackie Robinson and why is he important?




A: Jackie Robinson was an American baseball player who became the first African American to play in Major League Baseball in 1947. He played for the Brooklyn Dodgers and helped them win several championships. He was also a civil rights activist who fought against racial discrimination and injustice. He was an inspiration and a hero for many people, especially minorities and immigrants.


Q: What are some of the Chinese customs and traditions that Shirley Temple Wong follows or learns?




A: Some of the Chinese customs and traditions that Shirley Temple Wong follows or learns are:



  • Celebrating Chinese New Year with red envelopes, firecrackers, lion dances, and family reunions.



  • Celebrating the Mid-Autumn Festival with moon cakes, lanterns, and stories.



  • Using chopsticks, eating rice, drinking tea, and cooking Chinese dishes.



  • Respecting elders, honoring ancestors, and obeying parents.



  • Writing Chinese characters, reading Chinese books, and reciting Chinese poems.



Q: How does Shirley Temple Wong cope with the language barrier and cultural differences?




A: Shirley Temple Wong copes with the language barrier and cultural differences by:



  • Learning English from her teacher, her friends, her neighbors, her piano teacher, and her babysitting clients.



  • Watching movies, listening to radio shows, reading comics, and playing games.



  • Observing and imitating how Americans act, dress, talk, and behave.



  • Asking questions, making mistakes, and trying new things.



  • Keeping an open mind, a positive attitude, and a sense of humor.



Q: What are some of the challenges and opportunities that Shirley Temple Wong faces as an immigrant in America?




A: Some of the challenges and opportunities that Shirley Temple Wong faces as an immigrant in America are:



  • Challenges: Feeling homesick, lonely, confused, scared, or sad. Facing discrimination, prejudice, or racism. Dealing with stereotypes, misunderstandings, or conflicts. Struggling to learn English or American culture. Balancing her Chinese identity with her American identity.



Opportunities: Making new friends, learning new things, having new experiences. Discovering new talents, interests, hobbies, or passions. Finding inspiration, support, guidance, or role models. Achieving goals, # Article with HTML formatting (continued) Q: What are some of the similarities and differences between Shirley Temple Wong's life in China and in America?




A: Some of the similarities and differences between Shirley Temple Wong's life in China and in America are:



Similarities


Differences


She lives with her parents and loves them very much.


She lives in a clan house with many relatives in China, but in an apartment with only her parents in America.


She goes to school and learns new things.


She goes to a private school with only girls in China, but to a public school with boys and girls in America.


She makes friends with people who share her interests and values.


She makes friends with people who have similar backgrounds and cultures in China, but with people who have diverse backgrounds and cultures in America.


She enjoys playing games and having fun.


She enjoys playing Chinese games like shuttlecock and mahjong in China, but American games like baseball and hopscotch in America.


She celebrates holidays and festivals with her family and friends.


She celebrates Chinese holidays like New Year and Mid-Autumn Festival in China, but American holidays like Thanksgiving and Christmas in America.


We hope that this article has answered some of your questions about the book and its characters. If you want to learn more about them, you can read some of the quotes from the book that capture their personalities and perspectives. Here are some examples:



  • "I pledge allegiance to the frog of the United States of America and to the wee public for witches hands one Asian, under God, in the vestibule with little tea and just rice for all." (Shirley Temple Wong, Chapter 2)



  • "Be extra good. Upon your shoulders rests the reputation of all Chinese." (Mother, Chapter 3)



  • "You're a good kid, Shirley Temple Wong. You got guts. You don't squeal on nobody." (Mabel Lim, Chapter 4)



  • "You know what I like about you? You're not afraid to try anything. You're game." (Emily Levy, Chapter 6)



  • "You're a natural-born citizen of Brooklyn. You love baseball." (Joe Ferris, Chapter 7)



  • "You're my friend because you're you. Not because you're Chinese or American or anything else." (Harry Armstrong, Chapter 9)



  • "You are a very lucky girl. You have two countries, two cultures. You can choose the best of both worlds." (Señora Rodriguez, Chapter 10)



  • "You are a fine young lady. And a fine young lady is always a lady. A lady never lets her emotions rule her actions." (Mrs. Rappaport, Chapter 11)



  • "You're a great kid, Shirley Temple Wong. You've got what it takes. You've got heart." (Jackie Robinson, Chapter 12)



We hope that you enjoyed this article and that you will enjoy reading the book as well. If you have any questions or comments about the book or the article, please feel free to share them with us. Happy reading! 71b2f0854b


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