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Thomas White
Thomas White

I Wanna Buy A House



Those housing trends are continuing, causing 2023 to be something of a transitional year. Sellers still have an edge in many areas, thanks to continued scarcity of houses, and no one expects a dramatic crash in home prices or values. Still, the frenzied pace has definitely subsided, and many analysts see a shift towards a more balanced market, benefitting buyers.




i wanna buy a house



A final walk-through is an opportunity to view the property before it becomes yours. This is your last chance to view the home, ask questions and address any outstanding issues before the house becomes your responsibility.


There are multiple parties involved when getting a mortgage and buying a house. Your real estate agent is your representative in the home purchase transaction. Your agent will look out for your best interests by finding homes that meet your criteria, get you showings, help you write offers and negotiate.


A real estate agent represents you and helps you understand how to buy a house. Your agent will show you properties, write an offer letter on your behalf and assist in negotiations. Real estate agents are local market experts and can also advise you on how much to offer for each property.


Only you can decide which property is right for you. Make sure you see plenty of homes before you decide which one you want to make an offer on. Like much of the home buying process, you can do a great deal of your house hunting online.


Understand that making an offer on a home is sometimes the start of a psychological game. You likely want to get the home for as little as you can without losing the house outright. The seller wants to maximize the selling price of the home without scaring you away. Where should you start with your first offer? Conventional wisdom says to begin at 5 percent below the asking price, but market conditions will largely determine how much wiggle room you have. The more competitive the market, the more likely you are to face multiple bidders. In a soft market, where listings have been sitting unsold, you will have more negotiating power. In a rising market, prime listings will command the full asking price or more, and sometimes offering just a few thousand dollars above listing price can help your offer stand out. Either way, keep your budget in mind when you make your first offer and set a cap of how high you are truly willing to go.


Once your bid on a house is accepted, you set in motion the process that will take you to finally holding a set of keys in your hand. While you may be eager to move into your new place, it is in your best interest to do your due diligence to make sure you get a home that it is in good condition and at a good rate.


No matter when you plan to buy, there are a few things you should know. On average, the process of buying a house takes roughly six months. In 2021, the typical buyer reported searching for between 2 and less than 3 months. Then add to that 30-45 days to close.But the process of buying a house includes more than just touring homes. You also need to review your credit and financing options, find the right real estate agent, make offers and negotiate, get an inspection, prepare to move and, eventually, close on your new home.


Searching available homes online is a great way to start your house-hunting process. According to the Zillow Group Report, 95% of buyers use online resources in their home search. Start on Zillow and search for homes in your target area, then filter by price and your must-haves. Additionally, your agent can send you listings and schedule showings.


The final step to buying a house is, of course, closing on your new home. When that time comes, make sure you review your Closing Disclosure, which will outline the terms, final closing costs and any outstanding charges or fees included in your loan. Your lender will send the disclosure to you at least 3 business days before closing.


A home inspection is where you hire a home inspector to check out the house from top to bottom to determine if there are any problems with it that might make you think twice about moving forward. Think: termites, faulty foundation, mold, asbestos, etc. Sure, a lot can go wrong, but rest assured that most problems are fixable.


Now, you might see some housing lenders recommending the 28/36 rule. By this guideline, your house payment would be no more than 28% of your gross monthly pay and 36% of your total monthly debt payments. But if you follow this rule, you could end up not being able to afford your mortgage.


Sometimes agreeing on terms is quick and painless, but it can also be one of the hardest parts of the home-buying process. If your negotiations get intense, remind yourself that both parties want the same thing. The sellers want to sell their house, and you want to buy it!


As a buyer, you have the right to a professional home inspection before you purchase the house, and it would be crazy not to do it. This is one of the most important precautions you can take before purchasing a home because it keeps you from being blindsided by structural issues or expensive repairs. If the inspection reveals major problems with the home, you can ask the seller to fix the problem, reduce the price, or cancel the contract.


Buying a house can take as little as a few days if you're buying in cash, or can take years if you're counting the amount of time it takes you to save money for a down payment and decide where to live. In a competitive housing market, you may put in multiple offers on homes before one is accepted. Conversely, mounting worry over a housing recession could lead more sellers to pull their homes from the market, making it more difficult to find a suitable property. If you already have your money saved and have a good idea of the neighborhoods and type of home you want, the process will probably take you two to six months. Ask a local real estate agent for a more accurate timeline based on your local market conditions.


The minimum credit score need to buy a house can vary based on the type of loan. For an FHA loan, for example, it's possible to qualify for a mortgage with a credit score as low as 500. Other types of home loans, however, might require a credit score of 640 or better."}},"@type": "Question","name": "How Much Money Do I Need To Put Down on a Home?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "You'll need to put down at least 20% on a conventional home loan if you want to avoid paying private mortgage insurance (PMI). FHA loans have a down payment requirement as low as 3.5% while USDA and VA loans have no down payment requirement at all.","@type": "Question","name": "What Documents Do I Need To Apply for a Mortgage?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "The kinds of documents you'll need to apply for a home loan can include pay stubs, tax returns, bank statements, and investment account statements. The lender should ask for consent to pull your credit reports and credit scores as well.","@type": "Question","name": "How Much Money Will I Need for Closing Costs?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "Closing costs for a home purchase typically range from 2% to 5% of the home's purchase price. The more expensive the home, the more money you'll likely need to finalize the closing."]}]}] Investing Stocks Bonds Fixed Income Mutual Funds ETFs Options 401(k) Roth IRA Fundamental Analysis Technical Analysis Markets View All Simulator Login / Portfolio Trade Research My Games Leaderboard Economy Government Policy Monetary Policy Fiscal Policy View All Personal Finance Financial Literacy Retirement Budgeting Saving Taxes Home Ownership View All News Markets Companies Earnings Economy Crypto Personal Finance Government View All Reviews Best Online Brokers Best Life Insurance Companies Best CD Rates Best Savings Accounts Best Personal Loans Best Credit Repair Companies Best Mortgage Rates Best Auto Loan Rates Best Credit Cards View All Academy Investing for Beginners Trading for Beginners Become a Day Trader Technical Analysis All Investing Courses All Trading Courses View All TradeSearchSearchPlease fill out this field.SearchSearchPlease fill out this field.InvestingInvesting Stocks Bonds Fixed Income Mutual Funds ETFs Options 401(k) Roth IRA Fundamental Analysis Technical Analysis Markets View All SimulatorSimulator Login / Portfolio Trade Research My Games Leaderboard EconomyEconomy Government Policy Monetary Policy Fiscal Policy View All Personal FinancePersonal Finance Financial Literacy Retirement Budgeting Saving Taxes Home Ownership View All NewsNews Markets Companies Earnings Economy Crypto Personal Finance Government View All ReviewsReviews Best Online Brokers Best Life Insurance Companies Best CD Rates Best Savings Accounts Best Personal Loans Best Credit Repair Companies Best Mortgage Rates Best Auto Loan Rates Best Credit Cards View All AcademyAcademy Investing for Beginners Trading for Beginners Become a Day Trader Technical Analysis All Investing Courses All Trading Courses View All Financial Terms Newsletter About Us Follow Us Facebook Instagram LinkedIn TikTok Twitter YouTube Table of ContentsExpandTable of ContentsRequirements To Buy a HouseFrequently Asked QuestionsThe Bottom LinePersonal FinanceMortgageSix Requirements To Buy a HouseByTerri Williams Full Bio LinkedIn Twitter Terri Williams is a business, digital ethics, real estate, mortgage, and home improvement writer featured in several major brands.Learn about our editorial policiesUpdated March 14, 2022Reviewed byEbony Howard Reviewed byEbony HowardFull Bio LinkedIn Ebony Howard is a certified public accountant and a QuickBooks ProAdvisor tax expert. She has been in the accounting, audit, and tax profession for more than 13 years, working with individuals and a variety of companies in the health care, banking, and accounting industries.Learn about our Financial Review BoardFact checked by 041b061a72


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